Author Archives: edwardkellow

I love a good teacher

I love a good teacher

I’m never happier than when I am learning from a good teacher. At school, I always got better grades if I had confidence in the teacher. Now that I am properly middle aged, I still learn better if I trust my teacher. I listen better, I try harder, and I have more fun. Verbal, vocal … Continued

Six Training Hats

Six Training Hats

People who work with groups wear different hats. I’ve learned a lot from the gym instructors at the London Central YMCA who don’t actually wear hats, yet. “Don’t give up now, push yourself, see if you can work just a little bit faster” The YMCA instructors motivate and manage groups of people – mainly office … Continued

Why Maslow doesn’t satisfy real change-makers

Why Maslow doesn’t satisfy real change-makers

Why Maslow doesn’t satisfy real change-makers Years ago, well, towards the end of last century, I ran a training programme for a bunch of environmentalists. They were nearly all young leaders and visionaries who wanted to change the world. And change the world they did, every day, with exceedingly good humour. Beer, biscuits and extra large … Continued

Why I’m happy to be in good company

Why I’m happy to be in good company

Keeping good company At this time of the year e-mail updates are about as welcome as mince pies. Puffed up and full of additives. Mince pies, just to explain, are an essential part of Christmas in the UK, just as ‘end of the year’ e-mails tend to make their first appearance about now. Nevertheless I … Continued

Building Capacity Systematically: 12 Steps towards designing and delivering training collectively

Building Capacity Systematically: 12 Steps towards designing and delivering training collectively

It’s one thing to be a trainer. It’s quite another to explain how you do it to other people. Here is what I have learned from trying to pass on training skills and knowledge to other people. Key message: Be systematic 1 Be systematic in your approach to training needs analysis, design, delivery, evaluation, and follow-up. … Continued

Four ingredients of a successful training programme

Four ingredients of a successful training programme

Many trainers use acting skills to get their message across Growing up in Scotland, I was fascinated by the eponymous heroine of Muriel Spark’s novel ‘The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie’ which is set in an Edinburgh girls’ school. Miss Brodie gets her pupils’ attention by telling stories to bring history to life and – this … Continued

Challenging Assumptions about Education by Jane Kirton, Executive Coach

Challenging Assumptions about Education by Jane Kirton, Executive Coach

  Since my teenage daughter set off for the first day of the Autumn term at school a few weeks ago, I’ve been thinking about the shape and design of our education system and the many ways in which it’s changed since my own schooldays, whilst somehow staying fundamentally unaltered. The next four to eight … Continued

Giles Bartlett reflects on the Brixham Channel Scallop Workshop

Giles Bartlett reflects on the Brixham Channel Scallop Workshop

WWF UK’s Marine Policy Manager, and GAP2 partner, Giles Bartlett reflects on the Brixham scallop workshop, and discusses possible future developments for this exciting and progressive project It’s been 19 weeks since the Brixham Channel scallop workshop – an event that took a considerable amount of planning by the team and no less work to … Continued

Relational training and how to get to ‘flow’

Relational training and how to get to ‘flow’

Does it matter what trainers teach? Over the years I have run training programmes for a wide range of organisations and institutions. Based on my experiences, I’m not sure if it matters what trainers teach as long as the learners can see the relevance of the content, and the style of the training is ‘relational’. … Continued

Holiday Musings on Tribal Learning by Capucine Carrier, Change Consultant

Holiday Musings on Tribal Learning by Capucine Carrier, Change Consultant

Summer holidays. A time for letting the mind wander from one idea to another, connecting the dots in less automatic ways. This morning, a friend’s 11-year old son told me about his passion for the game of Minecraft. I usually stop truly listening after the seventh zombie or third giant frog, but this time, he was … Continued